There are three ways to use the new PKR:

  1. Browse and click on color-coded boxes that appear as if by magic as you scroll down.
  2. Click on a category for all the ParenTips under that particular category.
  3. Go to the Site Map (link) for an:
    • a) alphabetical list of all ParenTips.
    • b) A list of all 8 categories with every ParenTip in that category listed alphabetically.

Or mix and match! Have fun as you get the information you need!

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CAR BEHAVIOR

No, parents, not the child’s behavior. YOUR BEHAVIOR.

Guess what? You could be putting your child in danger every time you drive them somewhere.

Parents want to keep their child safe. It’s their job. Hard for me to believe that any of my parent readers would start the car before their child was safely restrained. But studies have shown that there are parents who put their children at risk by driving without a car seat, driving with one that is improperly installed, or not keeping  up with current recommendations.

Brand new guidelines were issued in March, 2011 by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Highlights:

Toddlers UP TO AGE TWO should be restrained in rear-facing seats (previous recommendations said age one).

Older children who have outgrown front-facing seats should use a booster seat until they are big enough to use the adult seat/shoulder belt in comfort and safety. Usually a child  can make this transition at the height of 4 feet 9 inches.

Children UP TO AGE 13 SHOULD RIDE IN THE BACK SEAT.

There are other car safety issues that have to do with parent behavior.

Never drive a car when you have been drinking alcohol or taking recreational or prescription drugs with a no-driving warning label. A parent driving the under the influence with a child in the car is committing  a crime. A parent driving drunk alone is putting his or her children at risk of becoming parentless.

Never drive when DISTRACTED. The list of distractions is long and growing:

using your cell phone, texting, putting on makeup, eating, writing yourself a note, paying attention to what’s on the radio, setting your GPS. Children can be a distraction: crying, whining, fighting, throwing things. A recent study found that 40 % of children unbuckled their safety belts while the car was moving. This is an emergency distraction! When any distraction occurs, safely PULL OVER AND DEAL WITH IT.

Smoking is not only a distraction but it puts your child at risk of inhaling secondhand smoke. You need a permanent NO SMOKING sign in both your

car and home.

Loud music hurts young eardrums. Turn the volume down or the radio off.

DRIVE CAREFULLY! DRIVE DEFENSIVELY!  WATCH THE ROAD! Precious and breakable cargo on board.

TELL YOUR FRIENDS THEY CAN GET A PROFESSIONAL, PERSONAL, AND PRIVATE ANSWER TO THEIR PARENTING QUESTIONS BY GOING TO info@ParentKidsRight.com